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AOM Presenter Symposium: Exploring the "Black Box" of Gender Diversity on Boards: The Value of Women's Expertise

  • 1.  AOM Presenter Symposium: Exploring the "Black Box" of Gender Diversity on Boards: The Value of Women's Expertise

    Posted 6 days ago
    Please join us for an engaging symposium exploring women on corporate boards!

    When: Monday, August 13th 1:15 - 2:45PM
    Where: Hyatt Regency Chicago: Roosevelt 1A


    Chair: Courtney L. McCluney (Darden School of Business, University of Virginia)
    Discussant: Christine Shropshire (W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University)

    Recent corporate scandals (i.e., Google, Uber) and political commentary disparage women's participation in and leadership of organizations. Some research indicates that women's presence in corporate governance is associated with positive financial and social returns for companies (Abdullah, Ismail, & Nachum, 2016; Post & Byron, 2015; Byron & Post, 2016; Zhang, Zhu, & Ding, 2013). These effects hold although women remain underrepresented on corporate boards, accounting for less than 30% of board seats (Catalyst, 2017). Although scholars have documented the association between gender diversity and firm outcomes, little research has examined mechanisms linking women's presence on boards to firm outcomes. Indeed, some studies demonstrate negative or null associations between gender diversity and firm outcomes (e.g., Jeong & Harrison, 2017).
    A majority of these studies rely on archival data aggregated across multiple industries to demonstrate associations between board diversity and firm outcomes. However, such approaches do not consider how underrepresented (i.e., women) board members shape these associations.  In this symposium, we claim that new perspectives are needed to revise and expand existing theory and research about women on corporate boards. Thus, we explore the "black box" that links gender diversity on corporate boards to firm outcomes. Specifically, our symposium addresses the following research questions: (1) How do women experience their director role?; (2) What specific decisions (e.g., product recall) do women board directors influence?; and (3) How do women board directors' gender and board identities affect decision-making? To address these questions, our symposium uses novel methodologies (i.e., qualitative) and data sources (e.g., Federal Drug Administration) within corporate governance research to assess the contextual and experiential factors connecting women directors to organizational outcomes. Ultimately, this symposium helps elucidate how women board directors influence decision-making processes and industry-specific norms, putting forth inclusive, transformational, and contemporary perspectives on women upper echelons leadership in today's workforce.

    Paper Presentations

    Walking the Tightrope of Optimal Distinctiveness as a Woman in the Boardroom

    Christine Shropshire (W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University), Kristie M. Rogers(Marquette University), & Suzanne J. Peterson

    (W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University)  

    Influence of Female Board Representation and Managerial Discretion on Product Recalls

    Corinne Post*(Lehigh University), George P. Ball (Kelley School of Business, Indiana University), Kaitlin D. Wowak (Mendoza College of Business, University of Notre Dame), & David J. Ketchen, Jr. (Harbert College of Business, Auburn University)


    "Nose In, Fingers Out": How Women Board Director's Experience and Exert Influence

    Tiffany Trzebiatowski*(Isenberg School of Management, University of Massachusetts Amherst), Morela Hernandez & Courtney L. McCluney (Darden School of Business, University of Virginia)



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    Courtney McCluney
    University of Virginia

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