Best Conference Paper based on a Dissertation

Best Conference Paper based on a Dissertation Award
Sponsor: Sage Publications

This award is given to the author of the best paper based on a dissertation completed between January 1 and December 31 of the previous year.

Papers considered for the dissertation award must be sole-authored. The title page should indicate that the paper is based on a dissertation and give the date of the dissertation defense.
                                                                                                                

Year Recipients Paper Committee Members
2017

Jamie Lee Gloor, Technical U. of Munich
Xinxin Li, National U. of Singapore
Sandy Geok Peng Lim, National U. of Singapore

An Inconvenient Truth? Interpersonal and Career Consequences of “Maybe Baby” Expectations” Eddy Ng (Chair), Dalhousie U.
Robin Church, Ryerson U.
Charlice Hurst, Notre Dame U.
Dana Kabat-Farr, Dalhousie U.
Sanjee Perera, U. South Australia
2016 Michael Johnson, University of Central Florida
Matthew Griffith, University of Central Florida
“Heavy is the head that wears the crown? Employee reactions to a supervisor’s adiposity” Lisa Nishii (Chair), Cornell University
Sabrina Volpone, U. of New Mexico
Stephan Boehme, St. Gallen University
Lena Knappert, Tilburg University
Eugene Son, Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations
2015 Sun Young Ki “The Creative Benefits of Valuing our Differences” Oscar Holmes IV (Chair)
David Dwertman
Florence Villesche
Sabrina DeeAnn Volpone
Jacqui Stephenson
Kristie McAlpine
Camilla Quental
2014 Lilian Otaye, Lancaster University “Moderated-mediated model linking diversity management to turnover” Myrtle Bell (Chair), Alexandra Beuregards, Jorge Gonzalez, Elizabeth Poposki, Amy Randel, Orlando Richard
2013 not presented
2012 Ioanna Lupu Approved Routes and Alternative Paths: The Construction of Women’s Careers in the French Big Four.”
2011 Rosanne Hawarden, Massey University “Glass Networks:  The network structure of women directors on corporate boards.” dt ogilvie (Chair), Charmine Hartel, Derek Avery and Laquita Blockson
2010 Whitney Botsford Morgan, University of Houston-Downtown “Mothers’ Psychological Contracts:  Does Supervisor Breach Explain Intention to Leave the Workforce?” dt ogilvie (chair), Charmaine Hartel, Akram, Alexandra Beauregard, Orlando, Yang
2009 Jamie Ladge, Northeastern University “Becoming a Working Mother: Identity, Efficacy and Resocialization following Re-entry.” Robin Church (chair) Donna Capodacqua, Lisa Nishii, Eden King
2008 Emily Amanatullah, Columbia University “Negotiating gender stereotypes:  Other-advocacy reduces social constraints in women in negotiations.”
2007 Victoria Brescoll, Yale University When can angry women get ahead? Status, conferral, gender, and workplace emotion expression.”
2006 Denise Lewin Loyd, Massachusetts Institute of Technology “Avoiding the Appearance of Favoritism in Evaluating Others: The Impact of Status and Distinctiveness.”
2005 Diane Bergeron, Teachers College, Columbia University Sex differences in research productivity: Job performance as a piece of the puzzle. Kecia M. Thomas (chair), Joy Schneer, Hetty Van Emmerik, Eileen Kaplan
2004 Ashleigh S. Rosette, University of Houston Unacknowledged privilege: Setting the stage for discrimination in organizational settings.
2003 Erica Gabrielle Foldy, Harvard University “Being all that you can be: Identity and interactions in organizations. Jeanette Cleveland (chair), Radha Chaganti, Debbie Litvin, Lisa Scherer, Teresa Rothausen

2002 Kimberly-Ann Eddleston, Northeastern University . Jeanette Cleveland (chair), Jocelyn Finley-Hervey, David Ford
2001 Aparna Joshi, Rutgers University The context in which some differences make a difference: Examining the influence of organizational demography on outcomes of team diversity.
2000 Amy Randel How do members of groups diverse on multiple dimensions conceptualize one another? Social contextual triggers and work group conflict implications of identity salience.
1999 CV Harquail (chair)
1998 Orlando Curtae’ Richard The performance impact of coalescing racial diversity with a growth strategy: Evidence from the U.S. banking industry. Myrtle Bell
1997 Myrtle Bell Attitudes toward affirmative action: Tests of a comprehensive framework.

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